Death to ‘austerity’. Long live sustainable abundance!

Greens are united in opposing neoliberal ‘austerity’, write Rupert Read & Sandy Irvine. But there’s another kind of austerity to which we are committed – that of living within ecological limits. But base the transition on social, economic and environmental justice, and there will be nothing austere about it. The future we’re working for is one of sustainable, life-enhancing abundance.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.theecologist.org

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Common Wealth Trusts: Structures of Transition

Organizing common wealth so that markets respect its co-inheritors and co-beneficiaries requires the creation of common wealth trusts, legally accountable to future generations. These trusts would have authority to limit usage of threatened ecosystems, charge for the use of public resources, and pay per capita dividends. Designing and creating a suite of such trusts would counterbalance profit-seeking activity, slow the destruction of nature, and reduce inequality.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.greattransition.org

Brilliant article on the REAL structural changes our society needs.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

”Casino Capitalism”: Economist Michael Hudson on What’s Behind the Stock Market’s Roller-Coaster Ride

the real problem is that we’re in a nonrecovery in America, and Europe is in an absolute class war of austerity. That’s what the eurozone is, an austerity zone. So that’s not growing. And that’s really what’s happening. And all that you saw on Monday was just sort of like a shift, tectonic shift, is people realizing, “Well, the game is up, it’s time to get out.” And once a few people want to get out, everybody sees the game’s up.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.truth-out.org

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

The Corbyn Phenomenon

A large proportion of the membership believe that Labour will not win again by accepting the current political narrative on austerity or immigration or welfare or inequality and offering only marginal changes to current government policy. On economic policy in particular they need to offer reasons for voters to believe that there are alternatives to the current status quo of poor quality jobs, deteriorating public services and infrastructure, and growing poverty alongside gross inequality at the top. That means, whether he wins or loses, working with the Corbyn phenomenon rather than dismissing it.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: mainlymacro.blogspot.be

Good analysis of the rise of Corbyn in the UK’s labour party – lessons to be learned for the left!

 

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Post-Capitalism by Paul Mason review – a worthy successor to Marx?

As a slice of futurology this book is no better than its many, equally speculative rivals. But as a spark to the imagination, with frequent x-ray flashes of insight into the way we live now, it is hard to beat. In that sense, Mason is a worthy successor to Marx.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.theguardian.com

Good review of Paul Mason’s latest book in the Guardian.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

The Eurozone’s Pyrrhic victory over Greece

the third bailout agreement destroyed everything and resolved nothing. Sooner or later, Greece and its creditors will be back in Brussels to continue their ritualistic late-night crisis talks; except next time around, the risks and consequences of a disorderly Grexit will only be greater, for there will be no credible political force to contain it. The Eurozone may have temporarily imposed a Carthaginian peace upon the “unruly” Greeks this summer, but the lessons of King Pyrrhus still loom ominously over the smoldering battlefield: one more such victory would utterly undo the single currency.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: roarmag.org

Europe’s new austerity diktat will not re-orient the Greek economy towards economic and ecological sustainability

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

How Economic Growth Fails

“one of the major roles of energy products is to support the growing overhead of our economy; this is what the discussion about the need for “net energy” is about. Thus, we need energy products that are cheap enough that they can be taxed heavily now, and still produce an adequate profit for those producing the energy products. If we find ourselves mostly with energy products that are producing cash flow losses for their producers, as seems to be the case today, this is an indication that we have a problem. We don’t have enough “net energy” to run our current economy”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: ourfiniteworld.com

Must-read article on the link between decreasing ‘net energy, debt and the economic limits to growth.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Interview: Paul Mason’s guide to a post-capitalist future

Mason is not alone in believing that humanity is on the cusp of a profound technological revolution, of course. What makes his analysis distinctive, however, is the way he fuses an account of the technological mutations of what used to be called “late capitalism” with an attempt to identify, as Engels put it in the late 19th century, the “midwife of the old society pregnant with a new one.” This won’t be the industrial working class, as Marx and Engels thought, but what Mason calls the “network.” By creating millions of networked people, Mason writes, “info-capitalism has created a new agent of change in history: the educated and connected human being.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.prospectmagazine.co.uk

Great interview in Prospect about Paul Mason’s latest book ‘Postcapitalism: a guide to our future’

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

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