Is the Lima deal a travesty of global climate justice?

As it stands, 21 years of tortuous negotiations may have actually taken developing countries backwards on tackling climate change. From an imperfect but legally binding UN treaty struck in 1992, in which industrialised countries accepted responsibility and agreed to make modest but specific cuts over a defined period, we now have the prospect of a less than legally binding global deal where everyone is obliged to do something but where the poor may have to do the most and the rich will be free to do little.

Source: www.theguardian.com

Finally, an honest and insightful evaluation of the Lima failure by Guardian journalist John Vidal.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

How Superstar Companies Like Apple Are Killing America’s High-Tech Future

all of the technologies in the iPhone ­– things like touch-screen technology, GPS, and so on — originated with government spending, funded by taxpayer money.

That’s why a company like Apple should be using a substantial portion of its super-profits to support government investment in the next generation of innovation. Instead, the company runs an entire division devoted to finding ways to avoid taxation.

Source: ineteconomics.org

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Michael Hudson: U.S. New Cold War Policy Has Backfired

German Chancellor Merkel seems to be ignoring German and other European economic interests. Still obsessed with her hatred of the East German Communist regime, she sees in Russia only an enemy, not an economic market and supplier of raw materials and customer for German manufactures and technology. Likewise, her political love for the United States deems it Europe’s natural friend, without taking into account how its New Cold War policy toward Europe – “Let’s you and Russia fight” – undercuts European continental interests and exacerbates its austerity.

Source: www.nakedcapitalism.com

Brilliant analysis by economics professor Michael Hudson of US and EU foreign policy towards Russia and its geopolitical consequences.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Owning is the New Sharing

There are many ways to own. Simply giving up on ownership, however, will mean that those who actually do own the tools that we rely on to share will control them. People who want an economy of genuine sharing are coming to recognize that they must embrace ownership — and, as they do, they’re changing what owning means altogether.

Source: www.resilience.org

Will the sharing economy be hijacked by capitalism? On owning and sharing in a changing economic reality

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Six Myths About Climate Change that Liberals Rarely Question

most liberals have just moved a giant boat-load of denial down-stream, and that this denial is as harmful as that of conservatives. While the various aspects of liberal denial are my main overall topic, here, and will be addressed in our following five sections, they add up to the belief that we can avoid the most catastrophic levels of climate disruption without changing our fundamental way of life. This is myth is based on errors that are as profound and basic as the conservative denial of climate change itself.

Source: www.resilience.org

Refreshing must-read article on the denial strategies of progressives who believe in climate change but are not willing to accept the inconvenient truth that we will need to change our way of life.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Debating the Sharing Economy

There is little doubt that the prosharing discourse is blind to the dark side of these innovations. At the same time, the critics are too cynical. There is potential in this sector for creating new businesses that allocate value more fairly, that are more democratically organized, that reduce eco-footprints, and that can bring people together in new ways.

Source: www.resilience.org

Absolute must-read article on the sharing economy by Juliet Schor looking at the light as well as the dark sides of this new economic reality.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

On peut créer des millions d’emplois utiles dans une perspective durable

La transition écologique et sociale, si elle est à la hauteur des exigences, et même en y intégrant la sobriété matérielle et énergétique, c’est beaucoup de travail à venir pour réparer, prévenir, prendre soin, à l’opposé du productivisme destructeur de biens communs et… d’emplois.

En revanche, le travail dans la sphère de l’économie devrait occuper sensiblement moins de place dans la vie des individus.

Source: alternatives-economiques.fr

Brilliant analysis by French economist Jean Gadrey. Social-ecological transition can create millions of jobs.

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Growth: the destructive god that can never be appeased

To try to stabilise this system, governments behave like soldiers billeted in an ancient manor, burning the furniture, the paintings and the stairs to keep themselves warm for a night. They are breaking up the postwar settlement, our public health services and social safety nets, above all the living world, to produce ephemeral spurts of growth. Magnificent habitats, the benign and fragile climate in which we have prospered, species that have lived on earth for millions of years – all are being stacked on to the fire, their protection characterised as an impediment to growth.

Source: www.theguardian.com

Brilliant must-read article By George Monbiot on the delusion of economic growth

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Use and Abuse of the “Natural Capital” Concept

Big problems certainly arise when we consider natural capital as expressible as a sum of money (financial capital), and then take money in the bank growing at the interest rate as the standard by which to judge whether the value of natural capital is growing fast enough, and then, following the rules of present value maximization, liquidate populations growing slower than the interest rate and replace them with faster growing ones. This is not how the ecosystem works. Money is fungible, natural stocks are not; money has no physical dimension, natural populations do. Exchanges of matter and energy among parts of the ecosystem have an objective ecological basis. They are not governed by prices based on subjective human preferences in the market.

Source: steadystate.org

Excellent must-read article by Herman Daly, the father of ecological economics, on the monetary valuation of ‘natural capital’

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

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