IEA Investment Report – What is Right; What is Wrong

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Recently, the IEA published  a “Special Report” called World Energy Investment Outlook. Lets’s start with things I agree with: 1. World needs $48 trillion in investment to meet its energy needs to …

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Interesting reading by Gail Tverberg of the latest IEA investment report highlighting in particular the difficulty to finance the energy investments needed in the next 20 years.

See on ourfiniteworld.com

Putting a Price Tag on Nature’s Defenses

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

A new study estimates the trillions of dollars of protection that ecosystems provide, although not everyone buys the premise.

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Defenses provided by ecosystem services like coral reefs etc. are worth $142.7 trillion a year but our current economic system is destroying these services at a rate of 16.2 trillion dollars a year.

See on www.nytimes.com

Economy on the edge: seeking a world that works for the 100%

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

The global economy is on the edge with 85 people having as much wealth as 3.5bn of the world’s poorest. We need a new story of an economy that doesn’t trash the planet

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Excellent Guardian article by Hunter Lovings, Robert Costanzo and others on the new ecological economic paradigm which can take the planet away from the edge.

See on www.theguardian.com

IEA Says the Party’s Over

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

The International Energy Agency has just released a new special report called “World Energy Investment Outlook” that should send policy makers screaming and running for the exits.

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Great analysis by Richard Heinberg of the international Energy Agencies recent ‘World Energy Investment Outlook’. World needs at least 48 trillion dollars investments through 2035.

See on www.resilience.org

Boom or bust time for critical thinking?

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Following the massive bailouts, stimulus spending and quantitative easing of recent years, everyone breathed a sigh of relief and went back to sleep, says Richard Heinberg. But the coming global energy crisis will likely provide the jolt that wakes everyone up again.

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Very good interview with Richard Heinberg in Eurozine – the problem with economics and limits to growth

See on www.eurozine.com

Scientists vindicate ‘Limits to Growth’ – urge investment in ‘circular economy’

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Nafeez Ahmed: Early warning of civilisational collapse by early to mid 21st century startlingly prescient – but opportunity for transition open

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Good review of the latest study by Prof. Ugo Bardi for the Club of Rome on how climate change and resource constraints will force us to rethink our way of life.

See on www.theguardian.com

The age of climate warfare is here. The military-industrial complex is ready. Are you?

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

Nafeez Ahmed: The risk of climate conflict is real, but securitising the planet falls into the trap of those who profit from global conflict

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Great Guardian article on the growing interest of the military in the climate chaos issue. "The securitisation of climate change – and with it the entire planet – is not leading to meaningful transformative action to transform the social relations necessary to mitigate and prevent dangerous global warming. Instead, while climate change accelerates, the corporate-military-industrial complex accelerates profits."

 

See on www.theguardian.com

Envisioning a Successful Steady State Economy

See on Scoop.itThe Great Transition

How do you envision a successful economy without continuous growth?

Willy De Backer‘s insight:

Another great article from Herman Daly (ex-World Bank) underlining that we need to "limit the economy’s physical scale relative to the containing ecosystem. The way to do that is to leave a large part of the ecosphere untransformed, to limit our absorption of it into the economic subsystem─to keep a large part of the earth ecosystem in natura—as a source for low-entropy matter/energy inputs and as a sink for high-entropy waste, and as a provider of life support services. In this context, laissez-faire takes on a new meaning─it is the ecosystem that must be left alone to manage itself and evolve by its own rules, while the economy is carefully constrained in aggregate scale to stay within the limits imposed by the ecosystem. To stay alive and produce, we must use environmental sources and sinks. But the rate of use must remain within the regenerative and absorptive capacities of the ecosystem. That quantitative limit on resource throughput at a sustainable volume will automatically get reflected in market prices, effectively internalizing the social value of sustainability imposed by limits on resource extraction. The metabolic throughput from and back to the ecosystem cannot keep growing."

See on www.thesolutionsjournal.com

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